Concussion, also known as minor traumatic brain injury is a condition that leads to an altered state of the brain, which occurs as a result of a blow or an injury to the head. They are usually mild and do not result in long-term damage, but can sometimes cause serious problems that require medical attention.

Causes

Concussions are common problems of contact sports such as boxing and football, but can also occur after a car accident, fall from a height or being violently shaken.

Symptoms

Common symptoms of concussion include temporary loss of consciousness and memory, headache and confusion. Other symptoms may include seizures, pressure in the head, slurred speech, difficulty in thinking and making decisions, lack of concentration, and ringing in the ears.

Diagnosis

Your doctor diagnoses concussion by reviewing your medical history and by performing a thorough physical examination. Your doctor will ask questions about the incidence of the head injury. Other tests such as such as CT and MRI scans, and electroencephalogram (EEG), which monitors brain waves, may be ordered to confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment

Treatment for concussion mainly involves taking complete rest from physical and mental activities. Treatment option depends on the extent of injury to the brain, and may include:

  • Medications for pain relief
  • Osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT)
  • Adequate hydration and intake of healthy meals with avoidance of sugars, refined or processed foods
  • Surgery for severe cases, such as bleeding or swelling of the brain
  • American Association of Neurological Surgeons
  • American Board of Neurological Surgery
  • American Medical Association
  • The Congress of Neurological Surgeons
  • College of Physicians and Surgeons of Newfoundland & Labrador
  • North American Skull Base Society
  • North American Spine Society